Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for tag: food

7 Foods That Whiten Teeth Naturally

Find out how to whiten teeth naturally with these 7 foods including strawberries, raisins and apples.

If your teeth need a little brightening, but you’d prefer to skip whitening treatments, you’re in luck. Here are 7 natural remedies for whiter teeth that you may already have in your kitchen.

—Jacqueline Lanigan, D.M.D.

Apples

Just chewing on apples helps scrub your teeth. Apples also have a high concentration of malic acid, which is used in some toothpastes. Malic acid increases saliva, which cleans your teeth and helps remove stains, according to a 2013 study conducted at the University of Grenada (Spain).

Pineapple

Pineapple is the only food that naturally contains bromelain—a compound with anti-inflammatory and cleansing properties. A recent study in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene found that bromelain is an effective ingredient in a stain-removing toothpaste.

Broccoli

Broccoli is high in fiber, and eating lots of fiber helps reduce inflammation in your mouth (along with the rest of your body). Eating crisp raw broccoli can help clean and polish your teeth and, according to research in the European Journal of Dentistry, the iron in broccoli has the added benefit of providing a wall of protection for your teeth against the enamel-degrading acid that’s produced by bacteria. This helps prevent stains and cavities.

Raisins

You may think raisins are bad for your teeth because of their sticky sweetness, but they’re actually protective. Research shows that bran cereal with raisins helps clean the mouth faster than the same cereal without raisins. Chewing raisins stimulates saliva, which helps prevent plaque, stains and cavities from developing by neutralizing the acidic environment created by other foods and bacteria in your mouth.

Cheese

Here’s another reason to smile for the camera and "say cheese." Cheese helps keep your teeth strong with minerals, such as calcium and phosphorus, and protein that protects tooth enamel. According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the lactic acid in cheese is also protective against tooth decay. Plus, hard cheeses help clean your teeth by stimulating saliva.

Water

Drinking water throughout the day promotes saliva production, which in turn helps keep your pearly whites, well—white. Sipping water during and after a meal also helps rinse your mouth of any debris and loose plaque.

Strawberries

Like apples, strawberries also contain malic acid, and they have the added benefit of ellagitannins, antioxidants that can help reduce stain-attracting bacteria and inflammation in your mouth. And, strawberries’ vitamin C can help prevent gum inflammation and periodontal disease.

http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/7_foods_that_whiten_teeth_naturally?page=8

What to eat to keep your teeth

Today’s nutritional approaches to oral health go beyond “don’t eat sugar.”

Good nutrition

“Adequate nutrition is important in disease prevention, and nutritional counseling is becoming an increasingly important tactic in preventive dentistry,” says Ken Sutherland, DDS, senior dental consultant at Delta Dental. “The quality and consistency of foods, their nutritional composition and the combinations in which they are eaten can affect oral health, including the likelihood of tooth decay,” he adds.

Ongoing research indicates that antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts may strengthen immunity and improve the body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation, all of which can help protect the teeth and gums. And some foods and dietary habits even have distinct effects on the mouth’s ability to handle cavity-causing bacteria attacks.

For example:

  • Calcium-fortified juices, milk and other dairy products are rich in calcium and vitamin D and help promote healthy teeth and bones, reducing the risk for tooth loss. Adding powdered milk to cooked dishes helps those who don’t like milk or cheese to get some of the calcium needed to protect teeth and jawbones.
  • Cheese unleashes a burst of calcium that mixes with plaque and sticks to the teeth, protecting them from the acid that causes decay and helping to rebuild tooth enamel on the spot.
  • Crisp fruits and raw vegetables, like apples, carrots and celery, help clean plaque from teeth and freshen breath.
  • Antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin C, and other nutrients from fruits and vegetables help protect gums and other tissues from cell damage and bacterial infection.
  • Recent studies indicate that fresh cranberries interrupt the bonding of oral bacteria before they can form damaging plaque.
  • Folic acid promotes a healthy mouth and supports cell growth throughout the entire body. This member of the B vitamin family is found in green leafy vegetables and brewer’s yeast.

You may already know that cavity-causing organisms feed on the sugar in foods such as soda, chocolate milk and candies and convert it to acid, which attacks tooth enamel and causes tooth decay.

  • But did you know that acidic foods and drinks can wear away your enamel, leaving your teeth sensitive, cracked and discolored?

Timing is everything

A diet that promotes good oral health is not just about the foods you eat or avoid — when and how you eat them is equally important.

  • Foods that take a long time to chew or that you hold in your mouth (such as cough drops) can damage teeth as they retain sugar in the mouth longer than do other foods.
  • Instead of snacking on sugary, carbohydrate-rich or acidic foods throughout the day, eat these foods just during meal times in order to minimize the amount of time teeth are exposed to acid. In addition, the body produces more saliva to help digest larger meals, which washes away more food and helps neutralize harmful acids before they can attack teeth.

Information courtesy of the Academy of General Dentistry

Article Courtesy of: Delta Dental

 


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