Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
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Waterford, MI 48328
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Posts for tag: Bad Breath

Not at Home? How to Get Rid of Bad Breath on the Go

When you wake up in the morning, getting rid of that bad morning breath is a no-brainer: You head to the bathroom and use toothpaste and mouthwash to freshen your breath. Scoring fresh breath at home is simple, but knowing how to get rid of bad breath while you're out and about can be trickier. After all, you're not always going to be near a sink or have your toothbrush handy. That's why it's important to have a backup plan in place. That way, if you do suspect that you have bad breath, you'll have a few tricks up your sleeve to get rid of it.

Sugar-Free Gum and Candy

Bad breath can sometimes be linked to poor salivary flow, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). The ADA suggests that chewing a stick of sugar-free gum or popping a sugar-free candy into your mouth can help get rid of bad breath and — if the gum or candy is mint-flavored — leave a fresher smell behind. Chewing gum and sucking on candy promote saliva production, which helps clear the tongue and teeth of bad-breath-inducing food particles and bacteria. Keep a pack of sugar-free gum or candy in your pocket or purse so you always have a backup plan.

Portable Mini Brushes

Keeping your toothbrush and a tube of toothpaste in your pocket may not be the most inconspicuous way to score fresh breath on the go. Adding a package of mini brushes, such as Colgate® Wisp®, can help you banish bad breath with a quick trip to the powder room. Designed to work without water or extra toothpaste, this pocket-sized bristled toothbrush has a toothpaste gel in the center. Use it once and toss it for quick touch-ups.

Chewing Parsley

In some situations — think of eating a garlicky meal on a first date — you may not have the tools for fresher breath in your pocket or purse. You're in luck if your dinner came with a parsley garnish. The University of Maryland Medical Center notes that chewing a bit of parsley or a sprig of mint can neutralize bad breath. Grab a piece and chew it quickly, and you'll have fresher breath within a few seconds.

Talking to Your Doctor

Quick fixes work well for bad breath that sneaks up on you at an inconvenient time. If you constantly suffer from bad breath, it may be more than just an annoyance. Talk to your dentist about possible causes of bad breath, which can include tooth decay, recent dental work and even digestive problems. Discuss how to get rid of bad breath that is caused by a more serious condition. Whether it's a once-in-a-while problem or a consistent issue, bad breath can be resolved with quick fixes and long-term solutions.

Source: Colgate: Oral Health Center

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/bad-breath/article/not-at-home-how-to-get-rid-of-bad-breath-on-the-go-0214

October 19, 2015
Category: Breath
Tags: Bad Breath   Mouth Odor   Halitosis  

11 Ways to Fight Bad Breath Naturally

By Barbara H. Seeber

EverydayHealth.com

What’s even more humiliating and socially unacceptable than the remains of a spinach salad speckled across a toothy grin? Yes, it’s bad breath.

Halitosis. A foul odor emanating from the mouth. It’s not a medical emergency, of course, but some 25 to 30 percent of the world’s population suffer with this distressing problem.

The origins of bad breath are not mysterious: dental cavities, gum disease, poor oral hygiene, coated tongue (a white or yellow coating on the tongue, usually due to inflammation) are among the most common. Hundreds of bacteria live in our mouths and some of them—on the tongue or below the gum line or in pockets created by gum disease between gums and teeth, for example—create sulfurous smells. Other causes may include malnutrition (fat breakdown gives your breath a fruity odor), uncontrolled diabetes, and dry mouth (saliva has an antimicrobial effect). Infections such as sore throat or sinusitis, or intestinal disorders, such as heartburn, ulcers, and lactose intolerance, also result in bad breath.

Bad breath can be intermittent as well. Food and drink, such as garlic, onions, coffee, and alcohol, can temporarily cause bad breath. Smokers also suffer from it. Whatever the cause, treatment involves correcting the underlying disorder—and/or perhaps trying a few easy solutions from 500 TIME-TESTED HOME REMEDIES AND THE SCIENCE BEHIND THEM.

Here are 11 ways to fight bad breath:

•If you wear dentures, remove them at night and clean to get rid of bacterial buildup from food and drink.

•Drink plenty of water and swish cool water around in your mouth. This is especially helpful to freshen “morning breath.”

•Brush after every meal and floss, preferably twice a day.

•Replace your toothbrush every two to three months.

•Arrange regular dental checkups and cleanings.

•Scrape your tongue each morning with a tongue scraper or spoon to decrease the bacteria, fungi, and dead cells that can cause odor. Hold the tip of the tongue with gauze to pull it forward in order to clean the back of the tongue.

•Chew a handful of cloves, fennel seeds, or aniseeds. Their antiseptic qualities help fight halitosis-causing bacteria.

•Chew a piece of lemon or orange rind for a mouth- freshening burst of flavor. (Wash the rind thoroughly first.) The citric acid will stimulate the salivary glands—and fight bad breath.

•Chew a fresh sprig of parsley, basil, mint, or cilantro. The chlorophyll in these green plants neutralizes odors.

•Try a 30-second mouthwash rinse that is alcohol-free (unike many off-the-shelf products). Mix a cup of water with a teaspoon of baking soda (which changes the pH level and fights odor in the mouth) and a few drops of antimicrobial peppermint essential oil. Don’t swallow it! (Yields several rinses.)

Or try this recipe from 500 TIME-TESTED HOME REMEDIES AND THE SCIENCE BEHIND THEM:

CRUNCH IT

Raw crunchy foods clean the teeth. Apples contain pectin, which helps control food odors and promotes saliva production. Cinnamon is antimicrobial. Active cultures in yogurt help reduce odor-causing bacteria in the mouth.

1 cup apple chunks

1 cup grated carrot

 1 cup diced celery

 ½ cup dried cranberries

 ½ cup crushed walnuts

 3 to 5 tablespoons plain nonfat yogurt

 Ground cinnamon

PREPARATION AND USE: Mix the apple, carrot, celery, cranberries, and walnuts together in a large bowl. Add yogurt by the tablespoon to moisten the mixture. Sprinkle with cinnamon. (Serves two.)

Save Your Breath!

If you're serious about learning what's causing your bad breath, consider scheduling an appointment with your dental professional. Given your full medical and dental history along with an oral examination, your dentist should be able to identify the culprit. The causes of bad breath are numerous and include certain foods, alcohol or cigarettes, poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, diabetes, dry mouth, sinus or throat infections, lung infections or abscesses, kidney/liver failure, gastrointestinal issues and severe dieting.

Treatment of Bad Breath
It is important to conduct thorough oral hygiene at home twice daily utilizing tooth brushing with a fluoride antibacterial toothpaste and flossing to remove food debris and plaque on teeth, bridgework and implants, and brushing the tongue to remove odor-causing bacteria. A published study reported that tongue and tooth brushing in combination with dental flossing significantly decreased bleeding of the gum tissue over a two week period of time as well as reduced bad breath1. Another clinical study conducted by the University of Buffalo dental researchers confirmed that brushing twice a day with an antibacterial toothpaste and using a tooth brush with a tongue cleaner can eliminate bad breath 2.

Tongue Cleaning is the Key to Fresher, Cleaner Breath
Cleaning your tongue is very important. You can purchase a Colgate 360 toothbrush with the tongue cleaner on the back of the toothbrush for cleaning both your teeth and tongue. After tooth brushing your upper and lower teeth with an antibacterial toothpaste, flip the toothbrush over to the tongue cleaner and place the tongue cleaner in the posterior region of the tongue and move it forward to the anterior section of the tongue. After you have scraped that portion of the tongue, rinse the tongue brush off with warm water to remove any odor causing bacteria. Then replace the tongue brush in the next posterior section again and repeat as described above again.

Consult your dentist or dental hygienist when choosing oral hygiene aids to help you eliminate plaque and odor causing bacteria and review the techniques that should be utilized at home. Also, ask your dental professional what oral hygiene care products they would consider you use to help eliminate bad breath (antibacterial toothpaste, antiseptic mouth rinse, tongue brushes or scrapers and interproximal cleaning devices).

The key to a clean, fresh mouth is optimal oral hygiene conducted at home on a regular basis and professional recommendations discussed with you by your dental professional.

© Copyright 2009 Colgate-Palmolive Company 

April 02, 2014
Tags: Bad Breath  

Bad Breath and Its Relationship to Oral and Systemic Diseases

“About 75 percent of bad breath or “halitosis” is caused by the mouth itself.  Other causes include gastric problems, sinus infections or severe gum disease,” says Mark Wolff, DDS, Ph.D., director of operative dentistry at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

One of the key successes in treating bad breath is determining the cause. Once your dental professional determines what the cause is then treatment for it can then begin1.

Bad breath can be caused by the following:

  • External factors – foods such as onions and garlic, beverages like coffee and alcohol, and smoking
  • Poor oral hygiene – where plaque and food debris is left on the teeth
  • Oral disease – gingivitis and periodontal disease
  • Dentures – plaque and food debris can form on dentures, which need to be cleaned daily
  • Tonsils – cryptic areas (crevices) in the tonsils can allow food debris to become lodged in the tonsil area
  • Respiratory tract infections – throat, sinus and lung infections
  • Dry mouth (Xerostomia) – can be caused by salivary gland problems, medication, mouth breathing, radiation therapy and chemotherapy
  • Systemic diseases – diabetes, liver, kidney, lung, sinus diseases and gastrointestinal disorders

How does Oral Disease Relate to Systemic Disease?
Recent research suggests a relationship between oral disease and systemic diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, respiratory infections and Alzheimer disease) and other medical conditions. When the gum tissue becomes inflamed causing gingivitis to occur, inflammatory mediators called cytokines that are in the gum tissue can enter your saliva and can also become aspirated into the lungs. Bacteria that are responsible for periodontal disease can also enter the circulatory system around the teeth and travel to other parts of the body. Oral bacteria may cause secondary infections or inflammation of other tissues or organ systems in the body (2).

Who Should You See If You Have Bad Breath?
If you believe your diet is causing bad breath, then consult with a dietician or nutritionist who can work with you to modify your diet. If you have poor oral hygiene and are suffering from gingivitis (inflammation of the gum tissue in your mouth) or have periodontal disease (bone loss around the teeth sometimes referred to as “pyorrhea”), consult your dentist and periodontist and work with your dental hygienist to improve gingivitis and thorough oral hygiene instruction at home. The tonsils and respiratory infections will need to be followed by your physician or a specialist such as an ear, nose and throat physician or pulmonologist. A large majority of people in the United States are suffering from dry mouth due to medications they may be taking, salivary gland dysfunction and those who may be going through radiation and chemotherapy treatment for cancer therapy. Please consult your oral maxillofacial
surgeon, your physician or oncologist for their professional recommendations for prescription or over-the-counter products that can alleviate dry mouth symptoms. Those patients who are diabetics, have liver or kidney conditions, and gastrointestinal disorders should see their physician, urologist or gastroenterologist for their insights on how bad breath can be reduced regarding these systemic diseases. Contact your dentist office for a recommendation of which dental or medical professional you should see for your bad breath condition.

References:
1. Ooh, That Smell: What to Do if It’s Coming From You – Dentists Discuss Treatments for Bad Breath. Reviewed information at hhttp://www.webmd.com/news/20010809/ooh-that-smell-what-to-do-if-its-coming-from-you.
2. The oral cavity plays an important role in the overall health of the body. Reviewed information at www.oralsystemicconnection.com. 



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