Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for: January, 2016

Do I Need to Have My Wisdom Teeth Removed?

In this article:

Preventive Efforts

When Is Removal Needed?

Your dentist says you need to have your wisdom teeth taken out. But they don’t hurt, you say, so why remove them? These days, oral surgery to remove wisdom teeth is a standard practice -- almost a rite of passage for young adults. It might not always be necessary, though. According to one study, 10 million wisdom teeth are removed each year from 5 million people. More than 60% of these removals aren’t needed.

Preventive Efforts

Still, just because your wisdom teeth aren’t a source of pain doesn’t mean there’s nothing wrong. The teeth could be stuck, or impacted. That means they can’t break through your jaw and into your mouth. Maybe your mouth is too small to make room for them, or the teeth  could be growing at an angle to other teeth. They can damage the tooth next door if they push up against it.

Some dentists take out healthy molars to prevent problems later on. As you age, the bones in your mouth get harder. That makes your teeth tougher to remove.

If you wait, you could have problems after surgery that range from heavy bleeding and fractured teeth to severe numbness and minor loss of movement in your jaw. These troubles could last a few days or a lifetime.

When Is Removal Needed?

When wisdom teeth cause problems, or X-rays show they might down the line, they need to come out. Other good reasons to take them out include:

• Damage to other teeth: That extra set of molars can push your other teeth around, causing mouth pain and bite problems.

• Jaw damage: Cysts can form around the new teeth. If they aren’t treated, they can hollow out your jaw and damage nerves.

• Sinus Issues: Problems with wisdom teeth can lead to sinus pain, pressure, and congestion.

• Inflamed Gums: Tissue around the area can swell and may be hard to clean.

• Cavities:  Swollen gums can create pockets between teeth that help bacteria grow and cavities form.

• Alignment: Impacted wisdom teeth can undo the effects of braces, bridges, crowns, partial dentures, or any type of dental work.

Your dentist will look at the shape of your mouth and the position of your teeth to make a decision. Your age plays a role, too.

Still not ready to part with your molars? You can ask your dentist to explain what he sees with your teeth. In many cases, you can wait several months to see if things change before making your decision. But if you have pain or notice swelling or a bad odor near your back teeth, it may be time for a second look.

© 2014 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


Some of these you've probably heard, but there are some new ones here that are new, practical and attainable to pursue those positive changes that you are past due wanting to make! This is worth printing and applying to all areas of your life, one at a time.  Don't forget to throw those dental goals in there too, your mouth and rest of your body will love you for it!

18 Tricks to Make New Habits Stick

Wouldn’t it be nice to have everything run on autopilot? Chores, exercise, eating healthy and getting your work done just happening automatically. Unless they manage to invent robot servants, all your work isn’t going to disappear overnight. But if you program behaviors as new habits you can take out the struggle. With a small amount of initial discipline, you can create a new habit that requires little effort to maintain. Here are some tips for creating new habits and making them stick:

1. Commit to Thirty Days – Three to four weeks is all the time you need to make a habit automatic. If you can make it through the initial conditioning phase, it becomes much easier to sustain. A month is a good block of time to commit to a change since it easily fits in your calendar.

2. Make it Daily – Consistency is critical if you want to make a habit stick. If you want to start exercising, go to the gym every day for your first thirty days. Going a couple times a week will make it harder to form the habit. Activities you do once every few days are trickier to lock in as habits.

3. Start Simple – Don’t try to completely change your life in one day. It is easy to get over-motivated and take on too much. If you wanted to study two hours a day, first make the habit to go for thirty minutes and build on that.

4. Remind Yourself – Around two weeks into your commitment it can be easy to forget. Place reminders to execute your habit each day or you might miss a few days. If you miss time it defeats the purpose of setting a habit to begin with.

5. Stay Consistent – The more consistent your habit the easier it will be to stick. If you want to start exercising, try going at the same time, to the same place for your thirty days. When cues like time of day, place and circumstances are the same in each case it is easier to stick.

6. Get a Buddy – Find someone who will go along with you and keep you motivated if you feel like quitting.

7. Form a Trigger – A trigger is a ritual you use right before executing your habit. If you wanted to wake up earlier, this could mean waking up in exactly the same way each morning. If you wanted to quit smoking you could practice snapping your fingers each time you felt the urge to pick up a cigarette.

8. Replace Lost Needs – If you are giving up something in your habit, make sure you are adequately replacing any needs you’ve lost. If watching television gave you a way to relax, you could take up meditation or reading as a way to replace that same need.

9. Be Imperfect – Don’t expect all your attempts to change habits to be successful immediately. It took me four independent tries before I started exercising regularly. Now I love it. Try your best, but expect a few bumps along the way.

10. Use “But” – A prominent habit changing therapist once told me this great technique for changing bad thought patterns. When you start to think negative thoughts, use the word “but” to interrupt it. “I’m no good at this, but, if I work at it I might get better later.”

11. Remove Temptation – Restructure your environment so it won’t tempt you in the first thirty days. Remove junk food from your house, cancel your cable subscription, throw out the cigarettes so you won’t need to struggle with willpower later.

12.  Associate With Role Models – Spend more time with people who model the habits you want to mirror. A recent study found that having an obese friend indicated you were more likely to become fat. You become what you spend time around.

13.  Run it as an Experiment – Withhold judgment until after a month has past and use it as an experiment in behavior. Experiments can’t fail, they just have different results so it will give you a different perspective on changing your habit.

14. Swish – A technique from NLP. Visualize yourself performing the bad habit. Next visualize yourself pushing aside the bad habit and performing an alternative. Finally, end that sequence with an image of yourself in a highly positive state. See yourself picking up the cigarette, see yourself putting it down and snapping your fingers, finally visualize yourself running and breathing free. Do it a few times until you automatically go through the pattern before executing the old habit.

15. Write it Down – A piece of paper with a resolution on it isn’t that important, writing that resolution is. Writing makes your ideas more clear and focuses you on your end result.

16. Know the Benefits – Familiarize yourself with the benefits of making a change. Get books that show the benefits of regular exercise. Notice any changes in energy levels after you take on a new diet. Imagine getting better grades after improving your study habits.

17.  Know the Pain – You should also be aware of the consequences. Exposing yourself to realistic information about the downsides of not making a change will give you added motivation.

18.  Do it For Yourself – Don’t worry about all the things you “should” have as habits. Instead tool your habits towards your goals and the things that motivate you. Weak guilt and empty resolutions aren’t enough.

 

This great resource tool courtesy of Lifehack.org

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/featured/18-tricks-to-make-new-habits-stick.html

 


Six Creative Ways to Get Your Kids to Brush Their Teeth

Is your child ready to start brushing his or her own teeth? Try these tips to get your young one on the road to developing an oral care routine. Once your child gets the hang of doing it, he or she will be excited to do it.

Start Brushing Children’s Teeth Early

•Work together to establish a clear routine and stick to it!

•Reinforce the importance of brushing teeth by giving them good, clear reasons. Tell them that brushing everyday helps to prevent cavities and will give them a beautiful smile.

Show and Tell with a Toothbrush

•Brush your own teeth while your child is brushing. Get down on their level so they can see what you are doing.

•Demonstrate how to brush in circles, like train wheels going around on a track from left-to-right and right-to left.

•Show them how you brush all their teeth, top and bottom, front and back.

Let Them Pick Their Own Toothbrush & Toothpaste

•Children's toothpaste comes in a variety of flavors and varieties- some even feature their favorite characters. Let them pick a couple of different ones, so they can switch it up.

•There are several children's toothbrushes that are colorful and fun. Let them pick one with their favorite colors and characters.

Encourage Them to Brush on Their Own (Around Age 2)

•Let them put the toothpaste on the brush and do it by themselves.

•Don't worry about the mess - it cleans up easily.

Make a Game of Brushing Teeth

•The minimum amount of time your children should brush is 2 minutes. Set a timer and see if they can continue for the correct amount of time.

•Brush along with them. Have a contest to see who can create the most bubbles with their brushing.

•Ask your children to show you how clean their teeth are after getting rid of all the cavity monsters.

Compliment Your Child’s Brushing

•You want them to develop a life-lifelong oral care routine, so use positive reinforcement.

•Create a sticker chart and give them stars for brushing their teeth twice a day and for flossing once a day.

 

Courtesy of Orajel

http://www.orajel.com/en/Resource-Center/Learning-to-Brush/Tips-to-Get-Kids-to-Brush-Their-Own-Teeth

 

 

 




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