Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for: September, 2015

Oral health: A window to your overall health

Your oral health is more important than you might realize. Get the facts about how the health of your mouth, teeth and gums can affect your general health.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What's the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body's natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body's resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

•Endocarditis. Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.

•Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.

•Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.

•Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.

•HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.

•Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.

•Alzheimer's disease. Tooth loss before age 35 might be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

•Other conditions. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren's syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.

Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you're taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you've had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

•Brush your teeth at least twice a day.

•Floss daily.

•Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.

•Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.

•Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.


September 15, 2015
Category: Teeth Whitening
Tags: Homecare  

Three Tips to Keep Teeth White From Colgate

Thanks to advances in oral care, people no longer have to walk around with stained or yellow teeth. These days, brightening your smile is as easy as visiting your dental professional for a whitening treatment or purchasing one of the many at-home treatment options available. Although these methods do help to produce a brighter smile, in order to keep teeth white, you must combine your efforts. Here are three proven methods for doing so:

Practice Good Oral Hygiene

Practicing good oral hygiene is essential for anyone who wants to keep his teeth white. Make a point of brushing your teeth immediately after you eat - this is especially true if you are consuming foods and beverages that are known to stain teeth. Consider using a whitening toothbrush twice a day to help remove any surface stains and decrease any yellowing effects. Additionally, you can also replace your current toothpaste with one made specifically for whitening. It's also important to floss at least once a day to remove any plaque that has built up.

Pay Attention to the Foods You Consume

Keeping your teeth white is a process. While practicing good oral hygiene is clearly important, watching what you eat or drink is just as crucial. Wine, sports drinks, tea, soft drinks, and berries are just some of the substances that can stain your teeth. The color found in these items originates from chromogens, which are deeply pigmented molecules. Unfortunately, these molecules take a liking to the enamel on your teeth, resulting in stains. You can still enjoy a cup of tea or bowl of berries from time to time - just make sure you're practicing moderation.

Schedule Follow-Up Treatments

To keep teeth white, it's not enough to get your teeth whitened once and expect them to stay that way. After you have had your teeth whitened in office, the dentist will likely send you home with an at-home tooth whitening treatment. You'll need to implement these treatments as directed by your dentist to keep your teeth white. The necessary frequency of these at-home cosmetic treatments will depend on the whitening method your dentist is recommending. Lifestyle factors, such as smoking and excessively drinking stain-causing liquids, may require more frequent touch-ups. Speak with your dental professional for more information about the at-home whitening method best suited for you.




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