Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for: May, 2014

May 28, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
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Your smile is one of the first things people notice about you. That’s why it’s so important to take care of it. Cavities aren’t just for little kids—you can get them at any age. When you consume sugary foods, soda, juice or energy drinks, you put yourself at risk for tooth decay and gum disease. Be smart. Always brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and floss once a day.

The bottom line for smiles that are healthy on the inside and out:

  • Always brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste for two minutes
  • Floss between your teeth daily
  • Avoid sugary and starchy snacks
  • Wear a mouthguard when you’re active
  • Don’t smoke
  • Don’t pierce your lips or any part of your mouth
  • See your dentist. Regular dental visits will help set you up to be Mouth Healthy for Life.

To learn more, visit our other Teens pages on MouthHealthy:  


Proper dental care is essential throughout the life cycle, no matter what your age. Here are some tips that should bring a smile to your face:

1. Your teeth and gums are made up of calcium, so you can imagine how important it is to make a deposit in the calcium bank. Eating foods such as yogurt, cheese and soybeans will keep your teeth strong. For breakfast, try having yogurt topped with a crunchy whole-grain cereal and fresh fruit to start your day off right.

2. Vitamin D, most of which we get from the sun's rays, helps us absorb the calcium in our body. This is just another benefit of getting outdoors and exercising. If you don't know what your vitamin D level is, it's easy to check with a simple blood test.

3. Diets that are deficient in vitamin C can cause severe dental problems, including loose teeth and bleeding gums. Try a salad with citrus fruits, such as orange or grapefruit sections, to boost your body's ability to fight those destructive symptoms, as well as plaque. Be sure to buffer citrus fruits by including them as part of a meal, because their acid content could potentially erode tooth enamel.

4. Although it seems like a "duh" statement, avoiding sugary foods is pivotal to help ensure dental health. Foods high in sugar, like candy (particularly the sticky types), convert to acids inside your mouth and can cause the harmful decay you're trying to avoid.

5. Saliva is one of our body's strongest soldiers battling bacteria. Foods that promote saliva production, such as tart or sour foods including lemons, limes, cherries and cranberries, can help your body fight bacteria in your mouth. Drinking water is another great way to produce saliva, clear bacteria and cleanse your oral cavity. Foods that have a high water content also help to thwart the process of decay by diluting the sugars in the foods you consume. In other words, eat your fruits and veggies.

6. If you can't find your floss during the day, opt for Mother Nature's toothbrush. Hard, crunchy foods, such as carrots and apples, can clean your teeth naturally.

7. Make sure you are brushing and flossing twice-a-day – every day! Flossing should be a part of your morning routine, and both brushing and flossing after dinner could even help you lose weight by discouraging bedtime snacking.

8. See your dentist every six months. Your teeth may not look dirty from the outside, but bacteria and plaque lurks in places you cannot see in the mirror.

[Read: Stop the Excuses! Go to the Dentist.]

9. Rinse out your mouth with mouthwash, or at least water, after every meal. This practice will help kill germs and prevent others from knowing you had onions on your sandwich.

Remember that a smile speaks every language – it's the only thing that depicts "one size fits all." A healthy smile wouldn't be the same without shiny teeth to lend their support.

Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN, has been owner of BTD Nutrition Consultants, LLC, for more than three decades and she is the author of Read It Before You Eat It. As a renowned motivational speaker, author, media personality, and award-winning dietitian, Taub-Dix has found a way to communicate how to make sense of science. Her website is BetterThanDieting.com 


A couple minutes.
A few questions.
A lifetime of great oral health.

 
Wouldn’t it be nice to know if you were at risk for oral disease before it became a problem? By taking just a few minutes to answer some simple questions about yourself and your oral health, our myDentalScore tool will assess your level of oral disease risk and your oral health needs. Visit myDentalScore today to find out how your oral health scores.


Teeth begin forming in your baby even before birth. Here is when you can expect to begin seeing them:

  • Central incisor (front two upper and bottom teeth): 6-12 months
  • Lateral incisor (the two teeth flanking the upper and bottom front two teeth): 9-16 months
  • Canines (pointy teeth in the upper jaw): 16-23 months
  • First molars (upper and bottom back teeth): 13-19 months
  • Second molars (upper and bottom back teeth): 22-33 months

All 20 primary teeth — also called baby teeth — are present in the jawbones at birth. The lower two front teeth are usually the first to erupt. This most often occurs somewhere around 6 months after birth. Do not be concerned if your baby is a little late. The numbers here are only an average. By age 3, all 20 primary teeth should be present.




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