Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for: June, 2012

By contactus
June 27, 2012
Category: Dental News
1. The toothbrush is dry.
It's tough to keep the toothbrush dry if you're actually brushing! Make sure to check your child’s toothbrush every day (and night ) – before it has time to dry.
 
2. You can still see food particles.
After your child has brushed, ask for a smile. If you can still see bits of food on or in between your child's teeth, send your child back to the bathroom for a do-over.
 
3. Teeth don’t pass the “squeak test.”
Have your child wet his or her finger and rub it quickly across the outside and inside of his or her teeth. If the teeth are clean, you will hear a squeaking sound.
 
4. Breath is everything but fresh.
If your child is brushing and flossing regularly, his or her breath should be fresh. The foul odor associated with bad breath is most often caused by food particles -- either food left in between teeth or food trapped in the grooves on the tongue.
 
5. Your child has a toothache.
Even if you can't tell if your child is brushing well, a toothache is a red flag. Make sure your child sees the dentist right away – a filling or other treatment may be in order.
 
Remember, brushing is just one part of your child’s total oral health regimen. In order to remove stubborn plaque and tartar buildup and prevent other dental problems, regular exams and cleanings are a must. Plus, your dentist can help reinforce the importance of good oral hygiene with your child.

 


By contactus
June 20, 2012
Category: Dental News
Tags: Your Mouth  

Patients rarely have a chance to clearly observe all areas of their mouths. It's difficult to see past the front of your teeth into the darker side and back areas. Often the cheeks or tongue block visibility.

But intraoral cameras have changed all of that. Now you can sit comfortably back in the chair while the dentist or hygienist inserts a sterilized small probe-shaped camera that is moved around the inside of your mouth. Covered with a disposable plastic sheath for contamination prevention, the wand simply takes a video of the inside of your mouth and transmits the images via cable to a computing unit. The computing unit enlarges the full-color images and sends them to a TV screen. Everyone is able to view together every last detail of your oral health.

This painless, no radiation technique allows us to see and document dental conditions such as worn-out, defective fillings, fractured teeth, decay, bleeding gums, oral lesions and plaque. The intraoral camera is a great diagnostic tool that provides an accurate view of the current state of your mouth and potential problems.

Second, the eye of the camera can show, in a moment, how well you're doing with your oral care home hygiene regimen. This helps you and your dentist realistically assess needed steps to improve your techniques and monitor your progress.

We can also freeze and store the video of the inside of your mouth for a bigger and better look and then make an instant photograph for you and your records or for the insurance company for verification of treatment.

As new technologies become available to us, we strive to keep up-to-date with the latest advances in order to provide our patients with the most modern, highest quality dental care possible. 


By contactus
June 14, 2012
Category: Dental News

 

A recent study at Rutgers University, and published in Phytochemistry, confirmed a long-held theory that ingestion of cranberries is helpful in protecting against harmful bacterial in the urinary tract. This is due to one of its natural compounds called proanthocyanidin [PAC's], and its anti-adhesion effect.

The anti-adhesion property of cranberries prevents bacteria from sticking to the urinary tract, which is one of the most common regions for a woman to develop a bacterial infection. Half off all women will experience at least one urinary tract infection in their lifetime. E. coli, bacteria that cause urinary tract infections, are becoming increasingly resistant to common antibiotics. The study concluded that 80% of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria were prevented from sticking by the anti-adhesion property of cranberries. There is some conjecture that PAC's found in cranberry may minimize stomach ulcers and gum disease by the same mechanism.

This study compared the action of PAC's in cranberries to those in other foods such as grape and apple juice, dark chocolate and green tea. Apparently, not all PAC-rich foods have the same success or offer the same protection. By means of comparison, one eight-ounce glass of cranberry juice has the equivalent PAC's as a cup of frozen or fresh cranberries, 1/3 cup of sweetened dried cranberries or 1/3 cup of cranberry sauce. Both this study and earlier research show that the benefits of one glass of cranberry juice kicks in about two hours after consumption and lasts for about 10 hours. So, it is recommended that you drink one glass of cranberry juice in the morning and one in the evening for the maximum protection. Remember, cranberry is a food and not a treatment. Keep in mind that anyone who suspects an infection should consult the appropriate health care practitioner.

Copyright © 2011 Futuredontics, Inc. • All rights reserved worldwide 

 


By contactus
June 11, 2012
Category: Dental News
Getting your kids to eat fruit, veggies and yogurt instead of candy, chips and ice cream might feel like pulling teeth. But it's important to encourage them to eat "smart" snacks to keep their teeth – and body – healthy.
 
Whether you’re transitioning your older kids to a healthier, balanced diet or just getting started with a little ones, here are some tips for healthy snacking:
 
Set the tone. Your kids mimic what you do, so it’s important that you eat smart snacks too. And be sure to practice good oral hygiene in front of your kids; if you brush and floss after meals and snacks, your kids will too.
 
Get creative with snacks. Show your kids that healthy snacks can be fun! Prepare tasty combinations, such as apple slices with peanut butter, fruit smoothies, meat and cheese rollups, or yogurt sprinkled with granola and bananas.
 
Keep your kids involved. When you make your grocery list, ask your kids to brainstorm about what kinds of food they'd like to eat. This is a good opportunity to help them understand what's good for their teeth and what's not. Then go grocery shopping together and teach your kids how to read the Nutrition Facts label so that they can check the sugar content.
 
Prepare nutritious meals. Snacking smart is great for your teeth, but so is eating well-balanced lunches and dinners. Make sure to add fruits and vegetables to every meal so that your kids become accustomed to them.
 
We can help you come up with even more ideas for healthy snacks – come in for a visit, and we’ll work on a plan together.

 




Archive:

Tags

ADA Patient Library