Waterford, MI Dentist
Lloyd H. Alpert, D.D.S.
4025 Highland Road
Waterford, MI 48328
(248) 682-6010

Posts for: December, 2011

If you're taking medications for certain health conditions, it may not have crossed your mind that they can also impact your oral health. After all, medications are supposed to bring equilibrium back to your system, not stir things up, right? Truth is a variety of prescribed medications can affect your teeth.

Antihistamines may cause dry mouth syndrome, which can lead to sore gums, making the mouth more prone to infection. Contraceptives and blood pressure medications may cause mouth sores, gum inflammation and discoloration. Blood thinners can interfere with your ability to form blood clots or cause heavy bleeding after a tooth extraction. Anti-seizure medications can cause an overgrowth of gum tissue (gingival hyperplasia) and make it difficult to practice good oral hygiene.

When you're taking medications and start taking other medications — whether prescribed, over-the-counter or illegal - it can change the effects of both the original and the new medications. Simply put, when certain drugs interact, they may increase or decrease the effects or produce another, unintended effect. This is why it's so important to keep your dentist informed about all the medications you take; any teeth medications you are prescribed will take this into consideration. 

  


By Staff
December 16, 2011
Category: Special Offers
Tags: Bleaching Special  

 Make your winter brighter…

And your smile whiter…

With our New Year’s special available through January 31, 2012

Receive $50.00 off initial bleaching service

This offer only valid with cleaning and exam

  


By Alpert Newsletter
December 14, 2011
Category: Dental News
Tags: toothache  

 

Home Remedies for Toothaches

Anyone who’s had the bad luck to be waylaid by a toothache knows that few experiences are more miserable. You want relief and you want it now. While home remedies may temporarily ease discomfort, the only way to get lasting toothache relief is to see a dentist.

Until you get professional help you may get some temporary relief using these toothache home remedies:

Rinse your mouth with warm water. Some toothaches are caused by trapped food particles. Use dental floss to remove anything wedged between teeth. This ensures a clean mouth and provides toothache relief.

Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. Toothaches can often be eased with pain relievers. Consider applying ice to the affected area as an additional toothache remedy.

Apply an over-the-counter antiseptic containing benzocaine. This is a tried and true temporary toothache remedy.

Avoid very hot or very cold foods. Toothaches lead to sensitive teeth, so treat them gently.

Toothaches won't just go away. Your ultimate toothache remedy will come from a dentist. Toothache remedies depend on the source of the problem; an X-ray will usually be used to check for decay or other dental problems. Then your dentist can perform the appropriate dental treatment, such as a tooth filling, tooth extraction or root canal.

Remember, toothache remedies can't top prevention! The best way to stave off toothaches is to practice good oral hygiene, including regular flossing and brushing. Another great toothache remedy is your dental visit; it helps your dentist prevent and identify problems before they become serious.

  

 

 


By Newsletter
December 07, 2011
Category: Dental News

Tips for Breaking Bad Oral Habits

Did you know that a lot of little things you do (or don't do) on a day-to-day basis affect your teeth's well-being and may fall under a list of bad oral habits? These include not brushing or flossing enough, eating too many sweets too often, or even using your teeth to open a bag of chips.

Bad oral habits die hard, but they can be stopped in their tracks by the following tips:

Floss at least once a day. It helps remove bits of food and dental plaque in places your toothbrush can't find, helping to keep your gums healthy.

Brush at least twice a day. If brushing is not an option, chew sugarless gum (make sure it's sugarless!) for 20 minutes after a meal or snack. This helps prevent tooth decay. 

Clean your tongue. Regularly cleaning your tongue with a toothbrush or a tongue scraper helps remove the bacteria that causes bad breath.

Replace your toothbrush regularly. Replacing your tooth brush ever 3-4 months is a good idea. Bristles in your toothbrush that are bent and broken don't do a good job cleaning your teeth.

Eat a balanced diet. Snacking on sweets without brushing increases the acid in your mouth… and the likelihood of tooth decay. Munch on vegetables and fruit instead.

Regular Dental Visits. Your dentist is trained to do damage control in your mouth before it's too late. You should visit the dentist regularly -- every six months.

Adding these to your list one at a time is a good start to kick those bad oral habits. By doing a little self-check on your daily dental care habits, you can be on your way to making sure your teeth, your mouth's health and your overall health are at their best.

  


It is important to educate patients about how their oral conditions affect their overall health.  More and more information emerges each day about the connection between certain serious medical conditions and poor oral health.  In fact, the American Academy for Oral Systemic health declared 2011 “The Year of the Mouth” and pointed out there is a growing mountain of research connecting poor oral health to the deadliest of diseases including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes.  “Oral health problems have also been shown to have close connections to many other serious health concerns like Alzheimer’s, arthritis, pneumonia and pregnancy complications,” they maintain.  The oral-systemic connection is apparent to all: dentists, medical doctors and, finally patients.  This is now causing a monumental shift in the dental health field.  Therefore, it is important to visit your dentist regularly to maintain a healthy body.  Taken from an article written by  Christine Taxin.

  




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